2007 Gilder Lehrman Institute

Sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library in Staunton, Virginia, on June 12-16, 2007

Instructors

Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

Paul Freedman, Associate Professor, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia  

Gilder Lehrman Institute Staff

Lesley Herrmann, Executive Director

Sasha Rolón, Seminar Coordinator ( rolon@gilderlehrman.org)  

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Staff

Eric Vettel, Executive Director
Joel Hodson, Director of Education ( jhodson@woodrowwilson.org)
Heidi Hackford, Director of the Digital Archive

Required Reading

Slaughter, Anne-Marie, The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World

Recommended Readings

Brands, H.W., Woodrow Wilson

Course Overview

This seminar will be based on Dr. Slaughter's forthcoming book: The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World.  It will examine seven core American values: liberty, democracy, equality, justice, tolerance, humility, and faith.  Participants will explore each value through American history, examining the specific trajectory of these universal tenets and the continuing struggles to translate these tenets from paper to practice.  Materials used in the morning sessions will include writings from the founding period and speeches, political tracts, poems, anthems, and novels that have had particular resonance in American life.  In the afternoon sessions, presentations, discussions, and workshops will focus on using primary documents from the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library to examine these seven core values in Wilson’s approaches to diplomacy and the strand of 20th- and 21st-century American foreign policy that has come to be known as Wilsonianism.  Participants will evaluate the application of these values at a time when the United States proclaims their universal validity but faces increasing international hostility. 

Schedule

Tuesday, June 12

3:00 p.m.--Check-in and registration begins at Frederick House, Staunton, Virginia

4:30 p.m.--Tour of Presidential Birthplace and Museum at Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, led by Linda MacNeil, Lead Interpreter.  Meet at The Dolores Lescure Center.

6:00 p.m.--Reception with welcome by Eric Vettel, Executive Director of the WWPL, and Lesley Herrmann, Executive Director of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.  Dinner to follow.  

Wednesday, June 13 (All sessions in Education Parlor, The Dolores Lescure Center, WWPL)

8:45 a.m.--Registration and Coffee


9:15 a.m.--Welcome, Joel Hodson, Director of Education, WWPL, and Sasha Rolon, Education Coordinator, Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and Introduction by Eric Vettel, Executive Director, WWPL

9:30 a..m.--Lecture, America as an Idea and a Set of Ideals, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

11:00 a.m.--Break

11:15 a.m.--Discussion with Anne-Marie Slaughter

12:30 p.m.--Lunch

2:00 p.m.--Presentation/Discussion, Communicating Politics: Elite and Mass Perspectives, with Paul Freedman, Associate Professor of Politics, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia

3:15 p.m.--Break

3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.--Projects Workshop with Paul Freedman and Heidi Hackford, Director of Digital Archives, WWPL, The Wilson eLibrary: Exploring Primary Sources

6:00 p.m.--Working Dinner, WWPL Garden or Trustee’s Room

7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.--Library and computer workstations available in Education Parlor    

Thursday, June 14 (All sessions in Education Parlor, The Dolores Lescure Center, WWPL)

9:00 a.m.--Lecture, The Blessings of Ordered Liberty, Anne-Marie Slaughter

10:30 a.m.--Break

10:45 a.m.--Discussion with Anne-Marie Slaughter

12:30 p.m.--Lunch

2:00 p.m.--Presentation/discussion, Political Communication in Election Campaigns, Paul Freedman

3:15 p.m.--Break

3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.--Projects Workshop with Paul Freedman and Heidi Hackford, The Wilson eLibrary: Processing Primary Sources

6:00 p.m.--Working Dinner, Garden or Trustee’s Room

7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.--Library and computer workstations available in Education Parlor 

Friday, June 15 (All sessions in Education Parlor, The Dolores Lescure Center, WWPL)  

9:00 a.m.--Lecture, The Strength of Our National Character: Tolerance, Humility, and Faith, Anne-Marie Slaughter

10:30 a.m.--Break

10:45 a.m.--Discussion and workshop with Anne-Marie Slaughter

12:30 p.m.--Lunch

2:00 p.m.--Presentation/Discussion, Political Communication and the Media, Paul Freedman

3:15 p.m.--Break

3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.--Projects Workshop with Paul Freedman and Heidi Hackford, The Wilson eLibrary: Assessing Bias in Primary Sources

6:00 p.m.--Dinner, Pullman Restaurant, downtown Staunton

8:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.--Library and computer workstations available in Education Parlor

Saturday, June 16 (All sessions in Education Parlor, The Dolores Lescure Center, WWPL)

9:00 a.m.--Participant project presentations

10:00 a.m.--Break

10:15 a.m.--Participant project presentations continued

11:30 a.m.--Lunch in Garden or Trustee’s Room

12:30 p.m.--Seminar conclusion, evaluations, presentation of certificates

Sections


did you know?



Wilson was president throughout World War I. He attempted to keep America out of the war and even won reelection with the slogan "He kept us out of war." Nonetheless, after the sinking of the Lusitania, continued run-ins with German submarines, and the release of the Zimmerman Telegram, America became involved. with the Lusitania, the continued harassment of American ships by German submarines, and the release of the Zimmerman Telegram meant that America joined the allies in April, 1917.

Woodrow Wilson was President when the 19th amendment was ratified in 1920 giving women the right to vote.

Wilson piloted the ship that brought America onto the world stage. He made the first steps of leading us out of isolationism, violating Washington's tenet of avoiding foreign entanglements.

He led America during World War I. His fervent hope was for the US to join a League of Nations, the precursor to the United Nations.

A Woodrow Wilson Quote: "Life does not consist in thinking, it consists in acting."

A Woodrow Wilson Quote: "The Constitution was not made to fit us like a straitjacket. In its elasticity lies its chief greatness."

A Woodrow Wilson Quote: "I believe in democracy because it releases the energies of every human being."

The Seventeenth Amendment was formally adopted on May 31, 1913. Wilson had been president for almost three months at the time. The amendment provided for the direct election of senators. Prior to its adoption, Senators were chosen by state legislatures.

Wilson was the first president to receive a PhD which he got in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University. He had received his undergraduate degree from the College of New Jersey, renamed Princeton University in 1896.

Woodrow Wilson could not read during the first decade of his life. Though undiagnosed, he may have suffered from a learning disability

Woodrow Wilson was known as "Tommy" until his college years.

Woodrow Wilson during his boyhood, helped establish the "Lightfoot Baseball Club" with his friends. Wilson played second base and was an avid sport fan throughout his adult life.

Woodrow Wilson was the first president to attend the Major League Baseball Fall Classic. He saw the debut of a young 20 year old pitcher by the name of George Herman "Babe" Ruth.

Woodrow Wilson was a graduate of Princeton University and Johns Hopkins University and the only president to hold an earned doctoral degree.

Woodrow Wilson image is on the $100,000 bill although it is no longer in circulation