Frank T. Ware

Frank T. Ware

The book, Evidences of Advances among Colored People, appeared in numerous editions after the first printing in 1902. With descriptions of institutions and short biographies, it seeks to prove that African Americans had indeed made progress since the Civil War, despite what some people thought. In the 1904 eleventh edition, the chapter that covers various business people lists two men from Staunton, Virginia. George H. White, a grocer, and Frank T. Ware, the owner of a furniture store. It is worth showing the entire passage on Ware.

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The Media Responds to a President

The Media Responds to a President

In the first year of his presidency, Woodrow Wilson approved the imposition of segregation on several federal agencies that had not been racially divided up to that point, even in places where segregation had been common, such as Washington, DC. William Monroe Trotter, of the National Independent Political League, responded with a speech against the move.

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German Education

German Education

An article by W. Barksdale Maynard in a 2007 issue of the Johns Hopkins Magazine quotes President Wilson from the 1919 Peace Conference. “I have always disliked German people. I have despised their educational ideas.” This is a bit of a surprise, since he chose to be among one of the early classes of graduate seminars at Johns Hopkins while still a young man.

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Young Boys at War

Young Boys at War

While rehousing  some items from the Rare Book Collection, we came across several books from the years between 1915-1919, intended for young readers in the United States. These books basically tell rousing stories about children going off to witness and even take part in the fights of the Great War. Despite what you might expect, the authors do not sugar coat modern battle.

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The Bruising Battle

The Bruising Battle

After returning from the Paris Peace Conference, Woodrow Wilson was determined to see the United States join the League of Nations, as he told the members of Congress. Still, many American politicians were unsure of whether entry into the League would be good for the United States. In order to fight for ratification, Wilson began a public speaking tour of the country in order to convince the American people to sway their senators in support of his plan.

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